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Pilgrims, Not Puritans

Pilgrims, Not PuritansModern history easily confuses the Mayflower Pilgrims with the Puritans who followed later in the 17th Century.

At the Twenty-Second General Congress of the Society of Mayflower Descendants held in Plymouth on September 13, 1960, the following resolution previously proposed by Deputy Governor General Louis Ellsworth Laflin, Jr., (IL) was adopted:

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Pilgrims and Puritans in 17th Century New England

Pilgrims and Puritans in 17th Century New EnglandThe history of Pilgrims and Puritans in 17th century New England reflects events in the reformation of English politics and religion. Summarizing the time-line of the English Reformation is the easiest way to show how these groups evolved in both England and America.

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Natural Disasters Hit New Plymouth

Natural Disasters Hit New Plymouth"It Pleased The Lord To Visit Them..."

In the first two decades of their residence in New Plymouth, the Pilgrims were visited by a number of natural disasters: Sickness, Fire, Drought, Locusts, Hurricane, and Earthquake. The first to hit them was undisputedly the most devastating and perhaps the only one generally known by their descendants today: the Great Sickness that halved the size of the Colony, men women and children, in the first five months following their arrival at Cape Cod on November 11, 1620.

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A Radical Call to Choose Life

A Radical Call to Choose Life"This is the Good News." I have to speculate whether this afternoon's Gospel lesson comes to us, 21st century, upper middle class, white Americans living in one of the wealthiest areas of our wealthiest of all nations. How did that sit with you: Don't worry about anything—not what you eat or drink or wear. What's the good news about advice like that when every morning the financial pages of our newspaper show our stocks on a roller coaster ride...

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Morrell's Poem on New England

Morrell's Poem on New EnglandThere are a few published eyewitness reports of early Plymouth Colony. The most famous is William Bradford’s history Of Plimoth Plantation that actually begins in 1550 and runs through 1647-8. Perhaps the next best known is the journal known as Mourt’s Relation that mainly covers the period from the Pilgrims’ departure from England in September 1620 through the first winter to 23 March 1621. Here, Morrell’s observations, recorded in both Latin hexameters and his own translation into English, were published in 1625.

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The Pilgrims in Art

The Pilgrims in ArtThe one Mayflower passenger whose physical likeness has come down to us is Edward Winslow. We can see his face as it appeared to the London artist who painted his portrait at elbow-length, body and head slightly to the left, during his last visit to the city, in 1651. What the other passengers looked like can only be imagined. Nor were painters ready to portray them taking their monumental strides until the nineteenth century, the great age of illustration of American history. Thereafter, paintings and prints proliferated. These and other illustrations in schoolbooks have powerfully shaped our sense of the Pilgrims as they embarked at Delftshaven, signed the Mayflower Compact, landed at Plymouth, worshipped publicly, and celebrated the First Thanksgiving.

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Mayflower Related Maps

Mayflower Related MapsThe Map Center at Ancestry.com offers a large collection of free, printable maps. Some which are pertinent to Pilgrim History are: "Localities in England Connected with American History" (includes Pilgrim villages); "The Netherlands at the Death of Elizabeth I - 1603"; "Grants to the London and Plymouth Companies of Virginia 1606 & Council for New England 1620"; "Plymouth Plantation 1620-1630"; "English Coast, 1625-1642: Piscataqua-Pemaquid Region Showing Plymouth Colony Cushnoc Trading Post"; "New Netherlands 1609-1664"; and "Early American Tribes and Cultural Areas."

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Pilgrim Clothing

Pilgrim ClothingPilgrim men did not wear black breeches, square white collar and cuffs, wide buckled belts, black steeple hats with a buckle, nor did Pilgrim women wear full black skirts, white aprons and dark capes. Puritan adults in Boston may have worn these clothes on formal occasions after 1632, but in 1621 the Pilgrims wore entirely different clothing. Pilgrim adults and children wore bright solid colors since their religion did not object to colorful clothing. They had many dyes so that red, green, beige, burgundy, blue, violet, as well as brown and black were worn.

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Purloined, Found and Recovered: The History of Bradford's History

Purloined, Found and Recovered: The History of Bradford's HistoryWhat is Bradford's history Of Plimoth Plantation? Most readers will recognize the title and some will know that it is the firsthand account of Plymouth Colony's history written during the period 1630-1650 by the Colony's second and, with 33 years, its longest serving governor. Although a good account of the Pilgrims' first months in New England is found in Mourt's Relation published in 1622 and Capt. John Smith has some history of the Colony in his New England Trials published in 1624 and Edward Winslow also has some history in his 1624 Good News From New England, none are as complete as Bradford's history.

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Index of Events and Individuals Named in Mourt's Relation

 Index of Events and Individuals Named in Mourt's RelationMourt’s Relation is the earliest known eyewitness account of the Pilgrims’ first seven months in New England plus a few additional events up through November 1621. It was published in 1622 in London. Its writing precedes William Bradford’s account, Of Plimoth Plantation, by a decade and the subsequent publication of Bradford’s by 234 years. This index is compiled from the Dwight B. Heath modernized, and indexless, edition published as Mourt’s Relation, A Journal of the Pilgrims at Plymouth. It consists of two parts: Events and Names.

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The Pilgrims and Election

The Pilgrims and ElectionIn the context of the political drama in modern elections a short consideration of the Pilgrims and their practical application of democratic principles is appropriate today during our celebration of Dutch-American Heritage Day—principles that to a large extent had a Dutch origin.

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