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Edward Winslow

  • 1621: A Historian Looks Anew at ThanksgivingNew publications still have some errors in fact.

    "A Thanksgiving for plenty. O Most merciful Father, which of thy gracious goodness hast heard the devout prayers of thy church, and turned our dearth and scarcity into cheapnesse and plenty: we giue thee humble thankes for this thy special bounty, beseeching thee to continue this thy louing kindnes unto vs, that our land may yeild vs her fruits of increase, to thy glory and our comfort, through Iesus Christ our Lord, Amen"

  • A Level Look at Land Allotments, 1623In 1623, the Pilgrims ceased rotating their field assignments each year and assigned use of the same plot to the same family group for that year and the next years. That this represented their discovery of the advantages of private property over communalism is a commonly repeated distortion that dates back to William Bradford himself. So when an oversimplified version of Bradford's memories surfaces in some place like The Wall Street Journal, as it did on the day after Thanksgiving, 2005, one shouldn't be too surprised.

  • After the First ThanksgivingAsk "the man (or woman) on the street" what he (or she) knows about the Pilgrims, and you will probably be told that they (1) celebrated the First Thanksgiving with the Indians, (2) came to America on the Mayflower in 1620 to find religious freedom, (3) landed on Plymouth Rock. Some may even know that half of them died the first winter. Few will know that the majority of them had spent at least a dozen years in Holland. As descendants and members, hopefully we know a little more.

  • Are you planning on traveling to England this summer? If so, this is a list of where some of our Pilgrim ancestors lived.

  • Comparing Plymouth and JamestownPilgrim families arrived in Holland in the spring of 1608 and in Plymouth in December 1620. In May 1607, 105 men arrived in Jamestown to establish the first permanent English settlement in North America. While the individuals in both settlements were English, the they were different in many important ways. To fully appreciate our Pilgrim heritage, it is important to understand the differences between Plymouth and Jamestown. This essay identifies major differences and explains how these differences affected the settlements during the first few decades of their arrival.

  • Edward Winslow Portrait Copy, Droitwich, England1945 — Edward Winslow Memorial Plaque, St. Peter’s Church, Droitwich, England
    Plaque with Winslow’s image and a different coat of arms on either side. Reads: SACRED TO THE MEMORY OF / EDWARD WINSLOW / BORN ON THE 18TH . OCTOBER 1595 IN DROITWICH. HE WAS / BAPTIZED ON THE 2OTH OCTOBER OF THAT YEAR IN THIS CHURCH / OF ST. PETER WHERE HIS FATHER WAS CHURCHWARDEN / 1599-1600. EDUCATED AT THE KING’S SCHOOL, WORCESTER, / HE SAILED WITH THE PILGRIM FATHERS FOR THE NEW WORLD / IN THE MAYFLOWER ON THE 6TH OF SEPTEMBER 1620. HE WAS A / FOUNDER OF THE COLONY OF NEW PLYMOUTH AND ON THREE / OCCASIONS ITS GOVERNOR. HE DIED ON THE 8TH MAY 1655. The plaque was commissioned by the Droitwich Town Council, cast by the Bromsgrove Guild, and dedicated on October 25, 1945 in the presence of the Mayor and Town Council, the Bishop of Worcester and Commander Agar representing the U.S. Ambassador. The Rev. William Sterry-Cooper, Vicar of St. Peter’s 1929-1936, in 1953 published a 67-page book, Edward Winslow and had been involved in projects to honor Winslow.


    1953 — Edward Winslow Portrait Copy, Council Room, Heritage Center, Droitwich, England
    This copy of the original portrait in Pilgrim Hall, Plymouth, MA, bears the following inscription on its frame: “Edward Winslow 1595 – 1655 / Born in Droitwich. Baptized in St Peter’s Church there. / A classical Scholar of the King’s School Worcester, / 1605 – 1611. / Governor of Plymouth Colony 1633-34 1636-37 1644-45 / Presented to the Town of Droitwich by the Historic / Winslow House Association of Marshfield, Massachusetts, / United States of America, on the occasion of the / Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II June 2nd 1953 / Copy of contemporary portrait by Elisabeth Weber-Fulop.”


    1973 — St. Peter de Witton Church Edward Winslow Memorial Vestry, Droitwich, Worcestershire, England
    No traces remain of the site’s original Saxon church. The chancel arch provides a fine example of the Norman building. The church was extended in the 12th century with a south aisle, later truncated to a south transept, which is now a Lady chapel. The south east window contains a very old example of stained glass work. The north transept was added in the 14th century. In the time of Henry VII the nave was altered. Perhaps the most significant memorial in the church, which draws visitors especially from the United States, is that to Edward Winslow, born in St Peter's parish in 1595, and one of the Pilgrim Fathers who sailed on the Mayflower. He served three times as governor of the Plymouth colony, and brought the first domestic cattle to America. The vestry built onto the church in 1973 was dedicated to his memory.



    Edward Winslow Bronze Statue, Droitwich Spa, England2009 — Edward Winslow Bronze Statue, Droitwich Spa, England
    Located in St Andrew’s Square shopping centre, a bronze sculpture of Edward Winslow depicts him taking his first steps onto land at what is now known as Plymouth Rock with an inscription of 1620. Designed by Sara Ingleby-Mackenzie, the sculpture is set upon a granite block engraved “EDWARD / WINSLOW” and there is also a simple plaque which reads: “Born in Droitwich on 18th October 1595 / Edward Winslow sailed to America aboard / The Mayflower in 1620 as one of the Pilgrim Fathers / determined to start a new life free from religious persecution. / After a terrible crossing with many deaths from disease severe bad weather drove the ship to what is known as Plymouth Sound where it cast anchor.”  The statue was commissioned by Kandahar Real Estates as part of their recent redevelopment of the shopping centre which the company owns.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • Governor Wislow Dies!EXTRA! Dateline Plimoth, July 1655 New England's 1st International Diplomat Dies at Sea. Word of Governor Edward Winslow's death as it may have been received in Pilgrim times.

  •  Marriage Pilgrim Style & The Pilgrim ChurchThe 1627 Plimoth Plantation presented a recreation of a Pilgrim wedding ceremony on August 14, 2010. They chose to go back to the year 1623 when Governor William Bradford, whose wife Dorothy May had drowned shortly after the arrival of the Mayflower in 1620, married Elizabeth Carpenter, the widow Southworth.

  • Mary Chilton and John Winslow Tablet, King’s Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, MA1901 — Mary Chilton and John Winslow Tablet, King’s Chapel Burial Ground, Boston, MA
    A tablet on the fence of the burial ground reads: KING’S CHAPEL BURIAL GROUND / 1630 / HERE WERE BURIED / JACOB SHEAFE 1658, JOHN WINSLOW 1674 / MARY CHILTON 1679, / A PASSENGER IN THE MAYFLOWER / AND WIFE OF JOHN WINSLOW. / MAJOR THOMAS SAVAGE 1682 / LADY ANDROS 1688, / CAPTAIN ROGER CLAP 1690, THOMAS BRATTLE 1713, / PROFESSOR JOHN WINTHROP 1776, / JAMES LLOYD 1831, CHARLES BULFINCH 1844. / ---------- / WILLIAM DAWES, JR. / PATRIOT AN SON OF LIBERTY / APRIL 6 1745 – FEBRUARY 23 1799. / THIS TABLET PLACED BY THE CITY 1901

    1920 — Mary Chilton and John Winslow House Site Tablet, Boston, MA
    A bronze tablet marks the house site on Spring Lane, Boston, of John and Mary Chilton Winslow. The arched top tablet, with an image of the Mayflower bordered in “rope” in the arch, reads: 1620  1920 / MARY CHILTON / THE ONLY MAYFLOWER PASSENGER / WHO REMOVED FROM PLYMOUTH TO BOSTON / DIED HERE IN 1679 / JOHN WINSLOW AND MARY CHILTON / WERE MARRIED AT PLYMOUTH ABOUT 1624 / CAME TO BOSTON ABOUT 1657 / AND BOUGHT A HOUSE ON THIS SITE IN 1671 / JOHN WINSLOW DIED HERE IN 1674 / AS A PASSENGER ON THE MAYLFOWER IN 1620 / MARY CHILTON CAME TO AMERICA / BEFORE ANY OTHER WHITE WOMAN / WHO SETTLED IN BOSTON / THIS MEMORIAL ERECTED BY THE / MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY OF / MAYFLOWER DESCENDANTS / JOHN BERNARD SCULPTER 1920

    1998 — The Brewster Islands Plaque, Boston Harbor, MA
    This plaque was a joint effort of the General Society and the Elder William Brewster Society. The text [only the case of the first 3 words  and line sequence are given here as on the plaque] reads: “THE BREWSTER ISLANDS / as you look out into Boston Harbor, about a mile and a half directly to the front, you will see the four Brewster Islands. They are, from left to right, Great Brewster, Middle Brewster, Little Brewster (with the Boston Light on it), and Outer Brewster. All were named in September 1621 by members of a Pilgrim Expedition, led by Miles Standish, which had sailed up from Plymouth in a shallop to explore the area. The four islands were named to honor Elder William Brewster, the patriarch and ruling elder from 1609 until his death in 1644. Elder Brewster dedicated his life to members of the Pilgrim Group.”

    John and Mary Chilton Winslow Grave Stone, Old King's Chapel Burying Ground, Boston MAUnknown — John and Mary Chilton Winslow Grave Stone, Old King's Chapel Burying Ground, Boston MA
    John Winslow, who came on the Fortune, was a brother of Pilgrim Edward Winslow. He married Mary, a daughter of Pilgrims James and Susanna Chilton. King's Chapel is a Unitarian church in Boston, Massachusetts, located at the corner of Tremont Street and School Street. Its burying ground is the oldest in Boston. This small modern arched top stone at the foot of a raised flat topped tomb reads: JOHN WINSLOW / PASSENGER ON THE FORTUNE / MARY CHILTON / PASSENGER ON THE MAYFLOWER

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  • First Encounter Beach Stone and Plaque, Eastham, MA1920 — First Encounter Beach Stone and Plaque, Eastham, MA
    Up on a knoll at the north end of the beach is a boulder with an attached bronze plaque having a relief bust profile with helmet facing to the right (perhaps of Myles Standish) centered between scrolls at the top, that reads: ON THIS SPOT / HOSTILE INDIANS / HAD THEIR / FIRST ENCOUNTER / DECEMBER 8, 1620 / OLD STYLE / WITH / MYLES STANDISH  JOHN CARVER / WILLIAM BRADFORD  JOHN TILLEY / EDWARD WINSLOW  JOHN HOWLAND  / EDWARD TILLEY  RICHARD WARREN / STEPHEN HOPKINS  EDWARD DOTEY / JOHN ALLERTON  THOMAS ENGLISH / MASTER MATE CLARK  MASTER / GUNNER COPIN / AND THREE SAILORS / OF THE MAYFLOWER COMPANY / PROVINCETOWN TERCENTARY / 1620 COMMISSION 1920. See the 2001 entry for the more recent marker on the beach near the parking lot.

    1966 — Lt. Joseph Rogers Boulder and Plaque, Cove Cemetery, Eastham MA
    Joseph accompanied his father, Pilgrim Thomas Rogers, on the Mayflower. Placed by his Descendants.

    1966 — Constance Hopkins Snow Boulder and Plaque, Cove Cemetery, Eastham MA
    Constance, who came on the Mayflower, was a daughter of Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins. She married Nicholas Snow who came on the Anne. Placed by her Descendants.

    1966 — Giles Hopkins Boulder and Plaque, Cove Cemetery, Eastham MA
    Giles, who died in 1690, was a son of Pilgrim Stephen Hopkins. The plaque reads “GILES HOPKINS / 1607 – 1690 / MAYFLOWER PASSENGER / PLACED BY HIS DESCENDANTS / 1966”.

    2001 — First Encounter Beach Plaque, Eastham MA
    In early December 1620 while exploring the beach north of the mouth of Herring River in present Eastham on the Bay of Cape Cod to decide were to establish their settlement, "they heard a great and strange cry, which they knew to be the same voices in the night... and one of their company being abroad came running in and cried, 'Men, Indians! Indians!' And withal, their arrows came flying amongst them.' " A bronze tablet mounted on the beach reads: NEAR THIS SITE / THE NAUSET TRIBE / OF THE / WAMPANOAG NATION / SEEKING TO PROTECT THEMSELVES / AND THEIR CULTURE / HAD THEIR / FIRST ENCOUNTER / 8 DECEMBER 1620 / WITH / MYLES STANDISH, JOHN CARVER, / EDWARD WINSLOW, JOHN TILLEY, / EDWARD TILLEY, / JOHN HOWLAND, RICHARD WARREN, / STEPHEN HOPKINS, / EDWARD DOTEY, JOHN ALLERTON, / THOMAS ENGLISH, / MASTER MATE CLARK, / MASTER GUNNER COPIN, / AND THREE SAILORS / OF THE MAYFLOWER COMPANY / THIS TABLET PLACED 2001 BY THE SOCIETY OF COLONIAL WARS / IN THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS.

  • A full list of all of the Pilgrim related sites to see in Plymouth.

  • Am I a Mayflower Descendant?
    For those of you who are curious about whether or not you may be descended from a Mayflower passenger please see our List of Mayflower Passengers and Genealogies Links below. The surnames found in the first three generations after landing are also included.

  • The Landing of the PilgrimsWhat is the significance of this painting? It might be titled "Ladies First!" Perhaps you can identify some of the individuals shown; that is probably Captain Myles Standish as the left wearing the helmet and holding the oar. Note there there are other women and children.

  • The Pilgrims in ArtThe one Mayflower passenger whose physical likeness has come down to us is Edward Winslow. We can see his face as it appeared to the London artist who painted his portrait at elbow-length, body and head slightly to the left, during his last visit to the city, in 1651. What the other passengers looked like can only be imagined. Nor were painters ready to portray them taking their monumental strides until the nineteenth century, the great age of illustration of American history. Thereafter, paintings and prints proliferated. These and other illustrations in schoolbooks have powerfully shaped our sense of the Pilgrims as they embarked at Delftshaven, signed the Mayflower Compact, landed at Plymouth, worshipped publicly, and celebrated the First Thanksgiving.

  • Two Lost Returned SafelyNew Plimoth, Cape Cod Sunday, 14 January 1621 (O.S.)

    On this day a party went ashore to return John Goodman and Peter Browne to the ship Mayflower. They had been lost for two days. Herewith follows Master Edward Winslow's relation of the events.